A recent Gigaom Research and North Bridge Venture Partners survey reported that nearly 67 percent of respondents believed they would move their data to the cloud over the next two years.The survey, which consisted of over 1,300 respondents, also reported SaaS adoption rose from just 13 percent in 2011 to 74 percent this year.

Mike Schutz, general manager of Cloud Platform Marketing at Microsoft commented on the survey,

“What comes across to me loud and clear from this survey is that even more businesses are no longer thinking “why cloud?” but will focus the next 12-24 months figuring out “how do I execute a long-term cloud strategy.”

Schutz’s comment was in line with the results — across all business apps (except manufacturing) 65-70 percent of respondents said they will move some or significant parts to the cloud within the next 12-24 months.

Other survey results included:

  • Survey respondents named agility, cost and scalability as the top three drivers for cloud adoption.
  • 56 percent of businesses are using infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS
  • 49 percent said they are using the cloud to create new products or increase their revenues.
  • Nearly 67 percent of respondents said they believed they would move their data to the cloud over the next two years.
  • 41 percent said they are using platform-as-a-service (PaaS) tools to build, develop, and test new applications
  • 49 percent said they were concerned about data security in the cloud.
  • 45 percent said they already, or plan to, run their company from the cloud.

“This wave of cloud computing that’s revenue and new-business driven is good news for long-suffering IT execs. If they can offload tedious but necessary cost-center functions, and refocus resources on cloud-driven new business, they might be able to retake their seat at the C-table,” said Gigaom’s Research Vice President, David Card.

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